How to write a news release quote that will get published

Set your quotes up for success with this quick tip

By Staci

It is no secret that quotes are among the first elements to be cut by editors and journalists from a news release. This should come as no surprise because most quotes are useless to the release and obviously self-serving. Shame on us!

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If you want to prevent your news release quotes from being thrown in the trash, you have to give journalist something worth publishing.
Photo credit: Cayusa / Foter / CC BY-NC

I can’t promise that this tip will absolutely get your quotes published, but if you abide by it, your chances will greatly increase. In fact, I like to make a little challenge out of the whole affair. How many outlets are going to run my quote in its entirety and how many outlets are going to cite the information shared in the quote and attribute it to the quote giver? I always try to beat my previous record.

The key to getting your quotes published is to make sure that they introduce new information, ideally in the form of facts and figures. News desks appreciate measurable and objective data. Also, don’t be afraid to be bold with your quotes.

The following two examples illustrate how you can use facts and figures to your advantage:

“We closed out the third quarter with orders up 30 percent over the same period last year,” said Mister Boss, CEO of Acme Co. “This continued growth tells me two things: we are meeting and exceeding our customers’ expectations and the local economy is starting to make a comeback.”

“We are honored to be one of only four centers to be selected for this government grant,” said Mister Boss, president of ACME Foundation. “This grant money will provide healthy and nutritious lunches for over 450 at-risk children throughout the summer.”

See what I did there? Can you identify the sound bites that are likely to make their way into a news report? Don’t give all of your best information away in the paragraphs of the news release. Save some of the compelling information for your quotes.

To say this is where the hard work ends would be a lie. You have to properly set up your quote with the lead-in paragraph. You also have to follow-up with a paragraph that builds off of the quote and ties up the information nicely with a big shiny bow.

The bottom line is this – if you want to prevent your news release quotes from being thrown in the trash, you have to give journalist something worth publishing.

This is a rule that consistently works for me. Do you use this approach or employ a different one? Let us know in the comment section below!